Why do I need a smart home control system?

Smart home control systems are becoming more affordable and useful everyday. They allow you to simplify your world by streamlining the comfort and control of your home. But how do you know if you need a custom smart home in your home?

Replaces many remote and apps

Sometimes the trigger for a smart home control system is to simplify a TV system. You can go from many remotes to one unified remote that turns on and sets up the TV and related equipment with one press of a button. Sometimes its that you want to use one app vs. a multitude of apps to control your smart devices like your smart doorbell, smart lock or smart lights. Or maybe its both – you just want one system that you can control all your TV systems and smart devices.

Simplifies a complicated home

If you have many home tech devices in your home, then its tricky to get them to work together. For example, when you press the “Watch TV” button on your remote control, you might want it to not just turn on your TV system, but also drop the shades and dim the lights for better viewing. Maybe its a ‘Goodbye” button at your door that turns off all your smart lights, stops your music streamers and adjusts the temperature when you leave your home. You can also have device like your thermostats, lights and shades on schedules or based on sunrise and sunset to set them for you. Or check and close your garage door if its left open, or alert you there’s a water leak before you have a major issue.

A smart home control system can also bridge smart devices that aren’t inherently compatible with each other and have them play well together for your comfort and control. Increasingly homes have more and more complicated tech – these can be coordinated into one simple-to-use interface.

Provides flexibility

Life gets busy. You shouldn’t have to search around for the right remote or app to control or check on something. You should be able have control and be informed if you’re at home or far away. A smart home control system can coordinate hand-held remote controls, touch screens, and smartphone and tablet apps so you just use what’s within reach.

A professionally installed smart home control system can simplify your life. One simple-to-use system, can provide convenience and comfort so you have have more time to relax and enjoy your home.

What is Wi-Fi 6?

 

We need Wi-Fi in our homes, but the Wi-Fi people haven’t been very good at making it easy for us to understand Wi-Fi versions. Most people aren’t sure what the letters mean; is 802.11ac better than 802.11n? Now they’re trying to make it a bit more easy to understand.

802.11 a/b/g/n/ac Wave 2 – really, its not just random letters

The fundamental issue is that the non-profit Wi-Fi Alliance has been using the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.11 working group naming. While we really appreciate the Engineers work on the technology, their naming conventions are a bit hard to follow.

The Wi-Fi Alliance has finally figured this out. While we may have gotten used to names like 802.11n and 802.11ac, they decided a straight forward numbering system would be easier for non-technical people to understand. So, they have used simplified to generational names moving forward. 802.11n is called Wi-Fi 4 and 802.11ac is Wi-Fi 5. The next Wi-Fi standard, 802.11ax, is christened Wi-Fi 6. It will take a while for this to catch on, but it certainly makes it easier to understand that Wi-Fi 6 is newer and better than Wi-Fi 4. Maybe in the future, the average consumer won’t even know or need to know what the IEEE name is for a future variant of Wi-Fi.

SU-MIMO vs. MU-MIMO, what the heck are those?

While we’re waiting for the new naming to stick, the fine Wi-Fi folk have a second wave of 802.11ac (or Wi-Fi 5) coming out. 802.11ac Wave 2 has a theoretical speed of 2.34 Gbps. Of course theoretical speeds, are just theoretical, but your could be looking at about 1 Gbps when you’re in decent Wi-Fi range. In general, this means that 802.11ac Wave 2 will give you about double your network speed of Wave 1.

There’s also some fancy technology updates like improved channel use, but the other big Wi-Fi deal is MU-MIMO. MIMO, or multiple-input and multiple-output, uses multiple antennas on both side to get more out of a wireless link. Here the wireless link is a Wi-Fi connection. The MU part stands for Multi-User. Older Wi-Fi was a round-robin waiting game. You hand to wait your turn to ‘talk’ to the Wi-Fi router (ie Single-User). Of course this goes super fast, so it seems like you’re always getting a Wi-Fi turn. MU-MIMO allows for multiple users to talk at the same time – four at a time for 802.11ac Wave 2. This will be noticeable faster.

A few things about Wi-Fi 6

As you would guess, Wi-Fi 6 will be even better and faster. Its theoretical top speed is 9.6 Gbps, so even real world speeds should be impressive. It also ups the ante by being able to connect with up to eight users at a time. They’ve also worked to make Wi-Fi 6 better for low power devices like small smart home sensors, so their batteries should last longer. Wi-Fi 6 also bulks up the security to use WPA3, the next generation of Wi-Fi security.

Hopefully we’ll start seeing the terms Wi-Fi 5 and Wi-Fi 6 being used more often. While it will take a year or so until Wi-Fi 6 devices are readily available, it will help us keep track of what we should be looking for vs trying to remember that 802.11ax is better than 802.11ac!

What you need to know about 5G mobile wireless

5G is the next generation of the mobile network. As it starts rolling out this year, it will offer faster data speeds and more reliable connections for smartphones and Internet of Things (IoT) devices. Its being described as super fast, always connected mobile Internet, but that’s not quite the whole story. While theoretical data rates can be up to 10 Gbps, we’ll likely be getting 50 Mbps and up in the real world. That’s nothing to sneeze at, but we need to understand the limitations.

Really high data rates, poor coverage

One of the set of frequencies that 5G uses is very high: 28 GHz. Higher frequencies allow higher data rates. The issue is that the higher frequencies have physics to deal with. Higher frequencies don’t propagate very far, and they aren’t very good at going through walls, trees, etc. You may notice that deep in some concrete buildings, your mobile phone often doesn’t have coverage. This will be worse with the really high frequencies networks.

This means that there needs to be a lot more base stations (kind of like Wi-Fi routers, but for telecoms). Small base stations fill in coverage for today’s 4G networks in places like concrete buildings (e.g. malls, subways). Many mini base stations will be needed in a city to make a 28 GHz network work at all. We should be getting over 1 Gbps when things are set up properly – that’s pretty darn fast! Beyond being faster than home Internet, 5G is also designed to respond faster to improve network latency.

Good data rates, decent coverage

The 3.5 GHz frequency band for 5G, on the other hand, will have similar coverage to what we get today but with better data rates. This is partly due to a littler higher frequencies. It’s also due to 5G implementing better technologies like MIMO (multiple antennas working to get data to you) and beam forming (those antennas ‘pointing’ the signal to you).

While data rates will be faster than 4G, they will only be a bit faster when your smartphone connects to a mid band 5G network. Not a bad fallback when the super fast version of 5G isn’t available in the your area.

Low data rates, great coverage

The low frequencies bands are really good for their inherent coverage. While the data rates will be slower, the lower frequency band, 600 MHz, can travel farther. It isn’t bothered as much by pesky buildings, trees, etc. While perhaps not very useful for a high data user (e.g. someone watching Game of Thrones at 4K on a bus), it will be incredibly useful to little devices and sensors scattered around our world sipping on data. These IoT devices could be handy for home tech, but also for commercial and industrial needs.

5G might not be the perfect, super fast mobile network some describe it as, but it will offer a significant step forward. 5G can also be used as a short cut to a fast Internet connection for rural households without wires or fibre. It may also kick off some really useful IoT innovations.

For coverage and high data rates, we may need mobile network boosters in our homes. Otherwise we’ll need smartphones that switch over to Wi-Fi networks better. (It’s quite possible that you may already need a booster in your home to get coverage for our current 4G network.) In the end, 5G may leave us wondering how we lived without out it.

Convenience vs. smart device privacy

There’s no denying the conveniences that technology provides in our lives. There’s streaming services, social networking, voice assistants, and smart devices that are truly great. All of this often comes at low dollar cost or sometimes even for free. There are trade offs of smart device privacy that you should be aware of though.

What’s the real cost?

This often comes down to how companies make their money. Do they make their money from selling devices or services directly to you, or are they basically (or totally) giving it away and making money from data tracking for advertising or selling info about you? Or maybe its a combination of these.

Vizio stormed into the TV market by selling TVs at very low prices. It surfaced that they accomplished this in part by selling people’s viewing data to other businesses. Its well known that Google and Facebook make money by ads layered into their free services. While Google looks to be trying to fix privacy issues, Facebook keeps getting their hands slapped for their cavalier use of data including detailed user data that was shared with their ‘partners’. Recently we learned that Amazon provides employees with scripts of users interactions with their Alexa voice assistant. While this makes sense to improve the service, we don’t know how securely they treat these scripts.

What can you do?

You should educate yourself on what the privacy cost is for your favourite tech. Then it’s up to you if you want to take advantage of devices or services without paying the real monetary cost of these. By carrying around a smartphone, we’re giving usage data to the smartphone manufacture and our mobile carrier. Often we’re happy to make this trade off for the features and convenience of smartphones. Apple is making a push to point out their privacy policy. Great, but you should read it and make sure it aligns with your privacy goals.

You can also turn off certain features. For example, you can turn off Apple’s Siri voice assistant from always listening (but then you can’t just say, “Siri…” when you want help). Similarly, you can set Alexa to not always listen and instead require pushing a button to get Amazon’s voice assistant on their devices. Of course, disabling these make voice assistants less useful.

You can also use a tool to track them track you. For example, Princeton has created a tool to track smart devices in your home. Its a worthwhile exercise if you have concerns.

Are they keeping your data safe?

Unfortunately even with your best research, you may not know that some companies aren’t up to speed yet. Even a giant like Facebook (yes, yet again) recently admitted to having a bunch of user passwords in plain text – readable by anyone in the company (or a hacker) and not digitally scrambled. The good news is that reputable companies are stepping up. Also governments are starting to provide privacy requirements like GDPR to help keep their citizens digitally safe. (Hopefully Facebook will finally get the memo after so many missteps!)

These’s no blanket right or wrong answer for everyone

Smart device privacy might be the top priority for some. For others, they’re happy to give away personal or aggregate information to get great services on the cheap. Just remember that you’re paying one way or the other. With some research or getting help from an expert, you can find your balance of tech nirvana and privacy.

Sonos streaming music architectural speakers

Sonos has been pretty busy of late. They’re bolstering their streaming music portfolio with additional products. Last year, they released a more affordable TV sound bar, and recently they updated with their Amp. Now, they have announced branded architectural speakers.

Sonos architectural speakers

Sonos is already great when used with architectural speakers. People get great sounding streaming music, and the speakers don’t visually impact a room. Architectural speakers are passive speakers (they need a separate amplifier) that are installed in ceilings and walls, so there is no need to have regular bookshelf or floor standing speakers in the room. This is great not only for current modern home aesthetics, but they also save valuable floor space. Sonos has announced three speakers: in-ceiling, in-wall and outdoor speakers. Sonos partnered with Sonance, a respectable speaker brand, for these speakers. These ‘matched’ speakers make it easier for consumers to understand and select architectural speakers if they’re the DIY types. The Amp also enables Sonos’s Trueplay which allows for easy speaker sound optimization. Other speaker brands will continue to sound great with the Sonos Amp, but these will help make architectural speakers more mainstream.

Sonos has more to come

Sonos recently also showed off some product prototypes that they have partnered wth Ikea for. The intent is to make Sonos compatible speakers more affordable and widely available. Sonos also quietly stoped selling their Play:3 speaker, so we suspect an updated version may be on the horizon. While we’re fans of Sonos, they’re not the only great streaming music solution out there. These recent updates are great as it pushes all brands forward and provides more great streaming music options available for consumers.

The new Sonos Amp

Sonos is replacing the Connect:Amp with their Sonos Amp. Unlike their standalone speakers such as the Sonos One, the Sonos Amp can be connected to stereo speakers or other speakers. For example, we often use it with in-ceiling speakers in homes. Its currently available to integrator people like us, and will be available to Canadian shoppers in February. The new Sonos Amp has most of the same connection options as the Connect:Amp (speaker connectors, left/right inputs, sub output, two Ethenet ports). It also adds an HDMI connector for TV connections. Overall it looks like a nice update – let’s take a closer look at its main features. 

Power output

The feature that most people will notice is that they’ve bumped up the power to 125W on each side from the Connect:Amp’s 55W. While most people don’t need the volume from the extra power, it should help improve the sound even at lower levels when parts of music need more oomph. This will be particularly handy if you’re using it with four speakers, such as four in-ceiling speakers.

TV friendly 

We think the Amp is most likely to find its spot hidden away in a technology closet in a home, but it can happily be placed in a living room. If you want to use it with your TV, it has a HDMI connector for TVs with an HDMI ARC output. You can start with just your stereo speakers (it emulates a centre channel). You can then add other Sonos speakers for surround sound. It also has an IR sensor so you can use your remote control for the volume.

Future features

We suspect some of the Amp’s best feature’s are yet to come. Since it’s a new platform, there are features that can be added in the future. For example, it’s compatible with Apple’s AirPlay 2 unlike the Connect:Amp. We look forward to the possibility of native support for other smart devices such as smart doorbells. 

While many see the Sonos Amp as an ‘integrator’ focused device, it should slot in with the same kind of people who are using a Connect:Amp with their stereo speakers. We’re currently testing ours with our turntable setup, and so far, so great! We look forward to using it in our clients homes to harness the increased output power and future technology options.

Understanding home control technologies


All of your tech gear, from TVs to smart home devices, needs to be communicated with to do the great things they do. Not too long ago, you could do this with a basic remote control. If you wanted to simplify your system, you got a (sometimes not-so-simple) universal remote that was able to control your TV, VCR (remember those?) and sound system. These days, there is a plethora of ways to communicate with everything from TV to smart home products. Here’s a crash course on the more common home control technologies that are used these days.

The difference between one-way and two-way home control technologies

There are two basic categories of device control: one-way and two-way. As it sounds, one-way controllers only talk one-way – they don’t listen to check if they were heard or understood. An old school TV remote is a one-way device. You point it at your TV and press a button, like a channel button. If you pointed the remote mostly towards the TV and all worked well, the channel would change. The remote has no idea if anything changed. That’s up to you – if it didn’t, then you need to press the button again.

Two-way controllers both talk and listen. You can use two-way devices to have a ‘conversation’ and confirm that the task was completed. The device can even send back information like what its volume currently is. 

One-way home control technologies

The more common one-way home control technologies used are IR and RF. IR, or infrared, is light that we can’t see. It is used to carry control signals. Since its light, devices need to ‘see’ their remote to work. Otherwise its pretty robust and is used for devices like TVs, sound systems and cable boxes. RF, or radio frequency, controls put the control information on radio waves. These are similar to IR, but with the added benefit that radio waves can travel through walls and cabinet doors, etc.

When one-way technologies fail, like in the channel change example above, you have to correct for it manually. For a simple system, like a TV and cable box, this usually suffices. (Not always, though: the elderly lady down the street often gets stuck in a cycle where her cable box is on while her TV is off, and vice versa.) For more complicated systems with many devices, you need to make sure that all the devices got their messages. Otherwise, results can and do vary. This is where two-way systems can overcome issues and ensure home tech bliss.

Two-way home control technology

Two-way home control technologies provide a much more stable interface since the controller can get a response from the device to ensure all is good. Common two-way technologies include RS-232, IP (Internet Protocol – wired or Wi-Fi), Z-Wave, ZigBee and Bluetooth. Note that Wi-Fi, Z-Wave, Zigbee and Bluetooth are all wireless technologies. These can work fine as long as devices are within the specified distances, etc. RS-232 and wired IP are usually preferred, as you don’t have to be concerned with wireless coverage issues. But, of course, you do need wires. 

Interestingly, RS-232 is actually a very old computer communications standard (from the 1960s!), but its still very capable and usually preferred by home technology professionals to control devices. The reason is that controlling devices doesn’t require much data or fast speeds, so the ol’ reliable RS-232 can still keep up with our latest technology. Its usually preferred even over wired IP, as then control doesn’t have to compete with other data, such as streaming Netflix video. That said, the ubiquity and consumer friendliness of IP makes it the go to for modern smart home systems. Obviously with a wireless control technology though, you don’t need to run wires around your home. 

The smart home system you choose often dictates the home control technology. Often people don’t consider the future headaches when choosing a certain technology for the wrong situation. Its not a coincidence that long term stable systems use a wired two-way control technology, especially old, boring RS-232. A good control system, like from RTI, will work with many or all of the home control technologies, so you can mix stable products with convenient wireless ones where the scenario makes sense. Either way, when implemented properly, you can harness their technologies to make a very complicated system a snap to use.

What is GDPR, and why so many privacy and terms of service emails?

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the European Union’s requirement on how businesses collect and use customer data. It came into effect on May 25th. European or international businesses that have customers there, must meet GDPR rules. This is great news, as home technology relies on many pieces from diverse providers. We’ve seen GDPR related emails from everyone from businesses like Google to bands such as the Arctic Monkeys. So, what are the rules?

Levels the playing field

The GDPR helps level the playing field. Companies can be ethical with consumer data protection and privacy, without risking unfair competition from others that are blasé or downright unethical with this data. The term personal data is a broad term that covers consumer data such as shopping behaviours and preferences, credit card information and addresses. Some experts estimate that only 25 percent of customer data in databases meets GDPR requirements. These corporations will have to improve transparency and protect consumer rights.

Consumer rights

General Data Protection Regulation gives consumers rights and control over their personal information. It has specific rights: the right to access, to be informed, to rectify, to erasure, to restrict processing, and to object, as well as rights in terms of data portability, automated decision making, and profiling. Basically this enables easy access to personal data and understanding on how its used. Businesses have been madly emailing out their polices to users to show that they meet these GDPR requirements.

There is a growing list of examples of why these type rules are needed (such as the scandal with Facebook and Cambridge Analytics). Canadians have rules for pieces like email list authorization, but we need a broad set of enforceable rules like the GDPR. In the meantime, we’ll happily piggy-back off the European Union’s rules for the international companies that we deal with.

How to choose the smarts for your smart home

DIY smart home hubs

Smart home technology options can make your head spin. How do you go about figuring out which smart home solution or solutions are right for you and your home? Its easy to get caught up with gizmos and sales pitches, so start with what you actually want to accomplish. For example, are you looking for some smart lights that automatically come on. Or a smart door bell to see who’s at the door no matter where you are? Or wireless speakers to make it easy to listen to more music? Perhaps you basically want it all!

Whatever you decide, think about what you want and why. Maybe its that you want your shades to close automatically at night and open in the morning. Sometimes its choosing smart lights because you have a frick-load of lights in the home you’re building, and you want a single lighting keypad vs. a wall covered with lights switches. Sometimes its to simplify home control for seniors or disabled people. Determine your targets and build out from there.

Once you have figured out your smart home targets, you can then start looking at how they will be controlled. There are three basic categories of smart home control: individual app based, DIY smart home ecosystems, and custom control systems.

Individual apps

If you’re looking at just a few smart devices, then maybe you don’t need a ‘master’ brain to control everything. For example, if you just want a smart thermostat and wireless speakers, you’d likely be well served using products like Nest and Sonos and their related apps.

Starting with a few apps to control your devices is great, but consider that you may want to add more device in the future. If you think that’s possible, its good to know what’s compatible with various ‘master’ brains. If you start using lots of smart devices, then it gets annoying switching between apps to control each device. This is where the next two categories come in.

DIY smart home ecosystems

This first level of ‘master’ brains are DIY (Do It Yourself) type smart hubs that tie your smart devices together. These allow higher level control such as grouping functions (like turning on music and setting mood lighting at the same time) or automation based on time of day or location, e.g. when you’re close to home – called “geofencing”.

There are various platforms such as Apple’s HomeKit, Samsung’s SmartThings, Amazon’s Alexa, and Google’s Nest. While all have their pros and cons, a big thing to watch out for is device compatibility. For example, some devices are compatible with HomeKit, but not SmartThings. Some devices like Sonos speakers have good cross platform compatibility, but some devices are restricted to only one platform. To complicate things further, some devices like smart locks make multiple ‘flavours’ of the same thing, so make sure you buy the right smart flavour (e.g. buy the box that is labelled compatible with HomeKit if you want it to work with HomeKit).

This category is changing fast as many manufacturers are updating compatibly with and without the need for smart hubs. Although these are called DIY, you’ll want to be fairly tech savvy to tackle the set up. You can see why even though these are called ‘Do It Yourself’, some people prefer to get help with them or DIFM (Do It For Me)!

Custom control systems

The next step in master brains, are custom control systems. The main benefits of custom control systems are to make complex things simple-to-use and orchestrate devices together at a higher level. Most products in this realm are only available to custom home technology integrators, as while they have great functionality, they are more technologically challenging to set up. Getting a professional to set up and program helps ensure that everything works smoothly for you. There are more control options available as well – e.g you can add wall control panels and handheld universal remotes to work in conjunction with a smart phone app.

The cool thing is that professional custom control systems such as RTI can also control many consumer and DIY devices. Custom control systems allow control of smart home devices that would become unwieldy in an app or DIY yourself type platform. They allow for total control of all your devices; from AV media systems to smart home devices.

There is no ‘one size fits all’ approach to smart home tech. A couple of app based devices may serve some people well, while DIY type system are better for others. Some people or circumstances require the use of a custom control system. We focus on solutions that make sense for our clients, so we help with all these categories. Feel free to reach out if you would like some help.

Is fibre optic cable needed in your home?

Fibre optic cable is becoming more mainstream – Internet providers are even marketing it as a differentiator for their service. We’ve touched on fibre optic cable in the past, but now is a great time to delve into it more. So, what is it all about, and should you use it?

Pipe for light

Fibre optic cable is a solid ‘pipe’ of glass (or plastic) that allows light to travel down it. It’s actually a glass core surrounded by a cladding layer of another type of glass. This layering arrangement helps the light bounce nicely off the sides of the core as it travels down the cable. Technically this is called a strand of fibre. Each strand of fibre is slightly thicker than a thick human hair. One or more strands are wrapped with Kevlar or similar (for durability for pulling through walls, etc.). These are then protected by a plastic cable jacket.

You can’t see it with your eye, but fibre optic light is turned on and off very quickly to create light pulses. These pulses carry data that can include Internet, phone and video. If you use the right fiber (multi-mode), you can also send different frequencies of light (basically different colours of light) for more signals over the same fibre optic cable.

Fastest way to move data (i.e. video data)

Yes, fibre optic cable is the best way to get Internet and video to your home and around in it. Phone company Internet providers need something better, as their old technology, two wires, is maxed out. (It’s really quite impressive how much stuff they were able to put over those two wires though – phone, internet and TV!)  Alas, two wires just can’t provide 100 Mbps or faster internet, let alone 4K video. They’re the first to roll out fibre optic, as they had to to keep up with cable companies. (Cable companies can push cable TV wiring a bit more, but they’ll have to go fibre optic eventually.) That said, you might not need the fastest Internet service available though and will be fine with non-fibre service.

Video is the hungry data hog in your home. Regular HDTV is bad enough, but full 4K TV can use up to 18 Gbps. (That’s a lot of data, and much more that copper wires can handle over any longer distances.) Tweaks can be made to make metal (usually copper) wire mostly handle this large amount of data over shorter distances, but fibre optic cabling is the right cable moving forward. If your 4K TV isn’t close enough, you’ll need fibre just to get a 4K signal from your TV gear.

Fast, plus now quite strong and bendy

Fibre optic is best suited for faster data and longer runs as the light pulse can travel far (up to Kilometres, depending on the fibre cable) and still be bright enough at the end. It also doesn’t suffer from issues like impedance (resistance, capacitance and inductance) that metal wires do. Impedance can be a signal killer by simply making it too weak at the end of the cable or make it impossible to move an electrical signal fast enough down the cable. Even with a whole bunch of engineering wizardry, those wires just can’t handle anything faster.

Fibre optic cable is also immune to electrical interference. Metal wires are effected by magnetic forces that are around electricity wires (e.g. power wires). This interference can make data harder or impossible to run though a metal wire.

The knock against using fibre used to be its price – it was very pricey to buy and work with, but that is quickly changing now. It’s increasingly easy to work with and has improved costs of cabling and putting plugs on the ends. Fibre optic cable is also not as fragile as it used to be. It’s often easier to install since it’s thinner and can be bent and pulled as much as or more than metal cable. (It will break though, where a metal wire may still barely work, sometimes sporadically, when kinked or bent too far.)

What should you do?

If you’re building or renovating a home, consider running fibre optic cable. Running to/from your network hub (i.e to/from the street) and TV/media areas are the first places to consider. Next, think about other areas that could use a lot of data, e.g. den. You can consider pulling it to Wi-Fi access points too, as when Wi-Fi data rates increase, fibre can feed it. You might not use your new fibre cable for a while, but it’s likely you’ll leverage it when 4K video hits the mainstream. Its a whole lot more affordable and less messy to install wire in the walls at build time than trying to do it later when your walls are all finished.

Our current minimum recommendation is duplex (two cables together) multimode OM3 (up to 100 Gbps) fibre optic cable, as current fibre equipment expects duplex, and its fast enough for the foreseeable future. The cost of fibre and related equipment will only come down. Sometime in the future when you’re setting up a new 4K TV system (or 8K TV!) or other data hogging gear, you’ll be happy you have your fibre optic cable ready.